My Blog

Posts for: May, 2018

By Kenneth J Oskowiak & Associates, DMD, PC
May 24, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: dental implants   crowns  
CementedorScrewedWhichImplantCrownAttachmentisBestforYou

In the realm of restorative dentistry, dental implants are king. A dental implant can replace a tooth with a permanent, life-like restoration with a solid reputation for durability.

Implants are also known for one other quality — variety. Not all implants are alike, and they have varied applications for use. Available in various shapes and sizes, they can be used for a single tooth or as part of a multiple tooth bridge or overdenture. And while their basic architecture is the same, you also have two options for how the permanent crown (the visible tooth portion) attaches to the implant: screwed or cemented.

A screw attachment can securely fasten a crown to an implant without the need for cement; it also allows for easy removal for repair or replacement should the crown become damaged or worn. On the other hand, it could pose a cosmetic problem — even though the access hole for the screw may be covered with a tooth-colored filling, it could still be distinguishable from the rest of the crown. There’s also a slight risk of the crown chipping around the access hole.

A crown cemented to the implant won’t have this cosmetic issue with an access hole, and will look just like a natural tooth. But unlike a screwed crown, removing a cemented crown can be more difficult. The cement may also cause gum inflammation and potential bone loss in sensitive patients.

The condition of your mouth, the type of implant you’re receiving and other circumstances will all factor into determining which method is best for you. If we’re “immediately loading” the crown (meaning we’re affixing a temporary crown to the implant immediately after placement in the jaw), then the screw method may be more advantageous. Aesthetically speaking, though, a cemented crown may be a better option in terms of final smile appearance.

But whichever method is used, you’ll still benefit from what implants do best — help you regain the function lost from a missing tooth and change your smile for the better.

If you would like more information on your options with dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “How Crowns Attach to Implants.”


By Kenneth J Oskowiak & Associates, DMD, PC
May 14, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
OrthodonticsCouldbeinYourSmileMakeoverPlan

When considering “smile makeover” options, it’s easy to focus on whitening, veneers or implants — techniques and materials focused mainly on the teeth and gums. But if you don’t also consider the bigger picture of how your upper and lower teeth come together to form your bite, these efforts may be a lot like picking out paint colors for a house with foundation problems.

That’s why orthodontics, the dental specialty concerned with the bite, could be a consideration in your smile makeover plan. Moving teeth into better positions not only improves your teeth’s function and health it could also help facilitate any cosmetic changes that follow.

The first step, of course, is to visit an orthodontist, a dentist with advanced training and experience in tooth alignment and function, for a comprehensive evaluation. Orthodontists are also knowledgeable in the growth and development of the bite, and so can develop a treatment approach that reflects the patient’s needs, whether a child or adult.

Treatments vary, depending on your particular needs. Fixed appliances like metal or clear braces that can’t be removed by the patient are the standard treatment for most malocclusions (bad bites). Clear aligners, removable trays that fit over the teeth with programmed incremental movements of the teeth, find the greatest application with adults. Orthodontists may also use specialized appliances, like temporary anchorage devices (TADs), which work to isolate teeth that need to be moved from those that don’t.

In comprehensive makeovers, orthodontists will work with a team of other dentists and specialists, including periodontists (specializing in the gums, bone and other supporting structures of the teeth) and oral surgeons. In these cases, orthodontic treatment may occur before or after other treatments with the overall goal of producing a beautiful, transformed smile.

If you would like more information on how orthodontics can transform your smile, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Magic of Orthodontics: The Original Smile Makeover.”


By Kenneth J Oskowiak & Associates, DMD, PC
May 04, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: teeth grinding   bruxism  
StopTeethGrindingNowBeforeitCreatesDentalProblemsLater

Chronic stress is like a tea kettle on the boil—all that “steam” has to go somewhere. We often do this through behaviors like biting our nails, binging on comfort food—or grinding our teeth. That latter habit, however, could have a detrimental effect on teeth, including excessive enamel wear or even fractures.

Also known as bruxism, teeth grinding is the forceful and often involuntary contacting of teeth that often generates abnormally high chewing forces. While not considered a relatively big problem with young children, it can be if you’re an adult. While there could be other causes, chronic stress is often a ┬áprime factor for adults with bruxism.

While teeth grinding can occur during the day when you’re awake, it often occurs at night during sleep and may be associated with other sleep disorders like snoring. Although you might not be consciously aware of a grinding episode as it happens, you may notice its effects the next morning, including sore jaws or headaches. Over time, your dentist may begin noticing its effects on your teeth.

So, how can you lessen teeth grinding? For starters, if you’re a tobacco user, quit the habit. Many studies indicate tobacco users report twice the incidence of teeth grinding as non-users. Excessive caffeine, alcohol or drug use can also contribute.

People have also found it helpful to address chronic stress through a number of relaxation techniques like meditation, more relaxing bedtime preparation, bio-feedback or therapy to “de-stress.” Although there’s not a lot of empirical evidence for these techniques’ effectiveness, there’s much anecdotal data from people who’ve found stress relief from them.

There’s also a dental treatment using an occlusal guard that, while not stopping bruxism, can help prevent dental damage. Usually worn during sleep, the custom-made guard fits over the teeth of one jaw, usually the upper. Its high impact plastic prevents the teeth from making solid contact, thus reducing the biting force. You may also be able to reduce bruxism effects through dental work and orthodontics,

You and your dentist can explore the options to find the right treatment strategy for you. By taking action now, you may avoid much more extensive—and expensive—problems with your teeth down the road.

If you would like more information on teeth grinding and what to do about it, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Teeth Grinding: Causes and Therapies for a Potentially Troubling Behavior.”